About

Richard Dougherty, Ph.D.

Headshot
Dick's headshot
Position
President, CEO
Bio

Dr. Dougherty is the CEO of DMA Health Strategies and President of the non-profit organization BasicNeeds US.

In his work with DMA, Dr. Dougherty currently leads a team of 13 staff in a variety of behavioral health policy and workforce development projects. This includes current leadership of a strategic planning engagement on substance use prevention with the City of Boston, recent leadership of the SAMHSA CCBHC planning grants and leadership of a five year evaluation of the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families Title IV-E waiver and joint DCF and DMH procurement.

The firm has recently completed two reports related to the Commonwealth’s opiate and substance use disorder crisis: first for the MA Center for Health Information and Analysis for a legislative report on access to treatment and second for the City of Boston, funded by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Foundation, on the availability of addiction and recovery services in the City. Dr. Dougherty also recently completed a 2014 study of the current capacity of the Massachusetts behavioral health system for the Massachusetts Health Policy Council. Dr. Dougherty was also the leader of a multi-year project known as Assessing the Evidence Base for SAMHSA to prepare 13 peer-reviewed research summaries for Psychiatric Services working with Westat and Truven and numerous university and other researchers.

He advises numerous national organizations, has published extensively, sits on several boards and received the 2011 Walter Barton Distinguished Fellow Award from ACMHA. As President of BasicNeeds US Inc., Dick is leading efforts to implement the model in Southwest Detroit with Southwest Solutions, the Detroit Wayne Mental Health Authority and project staff from BasicNeeds sites in Kenya, Ghana and elsewhere. Dr. Dougherty went to Colgate University, the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago and Boston University for his Ph.D. in Applied Social Psychology.